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This article is from the Encyclopedia of North Carolina edited by William S. Powell. Copyright © 2006 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher. For personal use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other use directly to the publisher.

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Royal Cake Company

by Wiley J. Williams, 2006

The Royal Cake Company, one of the oldest and largest bakeries in the United States, was established in Winston-Salem in 1925 as Easley Cookie Company, with David W. Easley as owner. Gray G. Welch and Henry Hicks bought the company in 1926. With Welch as president and Hicks as secretary-treasurer, the firm became Royal Cake Company in the mid-1930s. By the 1950s, Royal Cake's cream-filled oatmeal cookies (the firm's best seller) and 20 other types of pastries-including chocolate chip cream-filled cookies, banana marshmallow pies, Swiss rolls, brownie rounds, and fruit-filled cereal bars-were available in convenience stores, grocery chains, vending machines, and other venues in all states east of the Mississippi River. In the early 2000s Royal Cake Company, headed by CEO James B. Whitney, had 200 full-time employees and more than $30 million in annual sales.

 

Additional information from NCpedia editors at the State Library of North Carolina: : 

The Royal Cake Company declared bankruptcy in 2005 and was subsequently purchased by Flowers Foods.  

According to a Flowers Food representative (2/13/2015): "Our
company no longer sells cookies under the Royal brand. However, we do
use the Royal recipe for oatmeal cookies sold under the Southern Home
label, the store brand of BI-LO grocery stores, which are located in NC,
SC, TN, and GA."

References:

Lynn Jessup, "Royal Cake Company: Creme-Filled Creations," Our State 69 (May 2002).

Additional Resources:

"Company Info." FlowersFoods. http://www.flowersfoods.com/FFC_CompanyInfo/index.cfm (accessed September 16, 2014).

Origin - location: 

Comments

Comment: 

i love the royal oatmeal cookies also, just can not find them. They are so much better than Little Debbies .I don't buy Little Debbies. I just do without.

Comment: 

Would like to know if Royal Oatmeal Cakes (Original) still available anywhere?

Comment: 

Yes. Please indicate where they are available. My next question, is any one using the same exact recipe as Royal Cake or Southern Home? I do not like Little Debbie's recipe nor Ms. Freshley's. I like the Royal Cake or Lance recipe.

Comment: 

I seem to remember that in 1955 Mr. Joe Ingle was associated with Royal Cake Company on Academy Street. Can anyone provide any additional info?

Comment: 

My family loved the Royal oatmeal cookies. I tried the Southern Home oatmeal cookies from BiLo and they were great. Now they no longer carry them. Does anyone else use the same old Royal Oatmeal cookie recipe?

Comment: 

I would say Swiss rolls Cake is delicious. All flavors to put in the batter for their betterment of cookies plus they added some oatmeal.

Comment: 

I love royal creme filled oatmeal
cookies since I can't say when and I'm 74 now,but I can't find them anymore. Little Debbie does not come close.

Comment: 

Mrs. Freshley's Oatmeal Cremes taste like the Royal Cake Company Oatmeal Cakes

Comment: 

I found the Southern Home oatmeal cakes at Bi Lo. Yes,they are the Royal recipe! They put them in a very odd place in the store on the soft drink aisle, not the bakery or cookie sections.

Comment: 

A Royal route man once told me that other brands ground up stale or leftover cookies of all flavors to put in the batter for their oatmeal cookies plus they added some oatmeal. This may be why the other brands have a strange taste. Royal, however, used oatmeal and home style ingredients in their batter, per the routeman. All I know is they were decidedly different/better. I guess the lo carb craze took them out!

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